The Troll Variations
for a soloist
by
Tom Duff
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Instructions

This piece is for a soloist playing any instrument.

Alternate sections are marked Say and Play. The Say sections are spoken or sung to an improvised tune in a stentorian and condescending manner, as a traffic court judge lecturing a recidivist speeder. Read as though the text makes perfect sense, even though its grammar and meaning may make sudden, unexpected turns.

The Play sections use an ordinary five-line staff with oval note heads () interspersed with diamond () and cross () note heads. Play in a manner that contrasts with the lecturer's attitude. Be mocking or solicitous or calm or resigned or anything else appropriate.

You can play in concert with other performers, who may play other versions of this piece, or other any other materials, composed or improvised. When playing with others, the Say sections should be performed as disruptively as possible, and the Play sections should be played sensitively, with utmost regard to enhancing the performance of the other players.

Score

Say: How is that the comparison is restricted to the world that you are mistaken over and over.

Play:




Say: Pretty much the same moment as the father of serious music for them that their aliens from outer space story was fiction. Would you expect them to back down?

Play:




Say: Showing your true colors.

Play:


Say: The source is also incorrect. How gullible you are.

Play:


Say: You're presupposing that it "doesn't work". But Blast! is irrelevant here.)

Play:


Say: Bridgewater Hall, as I just told you: to calibrate what you consider to be interesting. A live orchestra performance does not indicate any high thoughts about you. Consult your dictionary.

Play:






Say: No, because it did occur to me. Having listened to the issue?

Play:


Say: Are you aware of your act and place the blame on the concert band". Apparently you didn't go "buh-bye".

Play:






Say: There are lots of "another thread"s in which the solo violin part is played on the respondent!

Play:




Say: Not in the title either!

Play:


Say: I can't impersonate that with which I was the one discussing American composers. It was to my discussion belongs there? I know that the Bartok is much longer than the "Fantasy Variations".

Play:






Say: Non sequitur, given that I was the one is isn't a "decent person".

Play:


Say: Figures.

Play:


Say: The title remains familiar, however, but the explanation is more likely because I have yet to substantiate my claim, hence I extracted the relevant section.

Play:






Say: Classic invective, as expected from someone "loonie" enough to not recognize what a "loonie" is.

Play:




Say: Irrelevant, given that you would now play the innocent routine. Of course, I already provided that information (and without anyone asking for it).

Play:






Say: Yet another name to add to the "Fantasy Variations".

Play:




Say: SWTHDTM?

Play:


Say: An illogical question, given that we're not dealing with something that "decent people" do. Thus by your own behavior.

Play:




Say: Note: no response.

Play:


Say: You're writing/performing it now.

Play:


Say: Shorter than Rachmaninoff's "Rhapsody" and shorter than Bartok's "Concerto for Orchestra", to which I'm replying: Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 17:44:38 -0400 Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 17:44:38 -0400 Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 17:44:38 -0400 Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 18:07:26 -0400 All later. Obviously you didn't go "buh-bye".

Play:


















Say: Incorrect; my justification is that the music will be "hypnotically fascinating".

Play:




Say: And the piece didn't have "Variations" in the Star of Indiana drum amd bugle corp. Check out James Barnes' "Fantasy Variations on a Theme by Niccolo Paganini". I think it would qualify as a problem. Just how long can a violinist go without some rest?

Play:








Say: Orbital eccentricity. I've also observed a lot of human eccentricity.

Play:




Say: Undoing the damage you've done nothing to do nothing but make personal attacks. I've been posting here for years. However, the probability of being noticed goes up considerably, and that happens when an antagonist like John Doe writes [to Professor Plum]:

Play:










Say: What good would that do? I've told you that you take another look at what you find irritating, or else you'd be irritated by the Dallas Wind Symphony with Frederick Fennell conducting.

Play:




Say: Non sequitur.

Play:


Say: On what basis do you call twelve accordions at the bottom of the meeting I was discussing involving American composers, thus it is the worst thing to ever be perpetrated on the stage isn't what you consider to be irritating? Indeed, my experience has been on every post of mine.

Play:










Say: The key word here is "if".

Play: