The Troll Variations
for a soloist
by
Tom Duff
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Instructions

This piece is for a soloist playing any instrument.

Alternate sections are marked Say and Play. The Say sections are spoken or sung to an improvised tune in a stentorian and condescending manner, as a traffic court judge lecturing a recidivist speeder. Read as though the text makes perfect sense, even though its grammar and meaning may make sudden, unexpected turns.

The Play sections use an ordinary five-line staff with oval note heads () interspersed with diamond () and cross () note heads. Play in a manner that contrasts with the lecturer's attitude. Be mocking or solicitous or calm or resigned or anything else appropriate.

You can play in concert with other performers, who may play other versions of this piece, or other any other materials, composed or improvised. When playing with others, the Say sections should be performed as disruptively as possible, and the Play sections should be played sensitively, with utmost regard to enhancing the performance of the other players.

Score

Say: Of course, I've already pointed out the "too long" excuse, given that you are.

Play:




Say: Repetition of a composer or not?

Play:


Say: Of what, allegedly?

Play:


Say: You might want to be "classical music", because it's played by a concert band.

Play:




Say: Actually, nobody has been "baiting" me.

Play:


Say: Where did I say that?

Play:


Say: Non sequitur, given your reference to Graham Chapman.

Play:


Say: Because there is no such composition.

Play:


Say: Sure: look above, and note the absence of any such cases?

Play:




Say: No claim will obviate the fact that you take another look at the base of the ocean?" "A good start."

Play:




Say: On the contrary, you're the one who brought up irritation.

Play:


Say: Note: no response.

Play:


Say: Evidence, please. Where have I posted non sequitors [sic]?

Play:




Say: The other two what?

Play:


Say: Precisely.

Play:


Say: Irrelevant, given that you are a more recent development. Note that a good or a bad thing?

Play:




Say: Therefore I could not have "pissed" on your part.

Play:


Say: Incorrect; it is Pudge that is the usual cause. What else could it be? The visual impact of a competitive ethos, or the competitive ethos? Depends on whether the "no" is included as the father of serious music for concert bands. It was the one is isn't a "decent person", so by your own admission. I'm doing exactly what you preach.

Play:












Say: Irrelevant, given that you are.

Play:


Say: But you can always quit...

Play:


Say: Even composers can be perpetuated.

Play:


Say: However, Pudge's complaint is not too long.

Play:


Say: Whose, yours?

Play:


Say: So the Marine band ignores quality when programming a concert? You routinely program dreck as often as quality pieces?

Play:




Say: You're presupposing that it "doesn't work". But Blast! is irrelevant here.)

Play:




Say: I compared the *structure* to the recording to refresh my memory about how the string parts were transcribed. Our arrangement was done by Jim Curnow.

Play:




Say: Irrelevant, given that the variations jumping from section to section as in Bartok (note that the Bartok is even longer.

Play:




Say: On the contrary, the theme is not classical music.

Play:


Say: Evidence, please. Where have you been?

Play:


Say: The "Fantasy Variation" don't either.

Play: