The Troll Variations
for a soloist
by
Tom Duff
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Instructions

This piece is for a soloist playing any instrument.

Alternate sections are marked Say and Play. The Say sections are spoken or sung to an improvised tune in a stentorian and condescending manner, as a traffic court judge lecturing a recidivist speeder. Read as though the text makes perfect sense, even though its grammar and meaning may make sudden, unexpected turns.

The Play sections use an ordinary five-line staff with oval note heads () interspersed with diamond () and cross () note heads. Play in a manner that contrasts with the lecturer's attitude. Be mocking or solicitous or calm or resigned or anything else appropriate.

You can play in concert with other performers, who may play other versions of this piece, or other any other materials, composed or improvised. When playing with others, the Say sections should be performed as disruptively as possible, and the Play sections should be played sensitively, with utmost regard to enhancing the performance of the other players.

Score

Say: I'm now beginning to doubt that I made comparisons are both longer.

Play:


Say: And it appears that the messages to which I'm replying: Date: Sun, 08 Jul 2001 18:07:26 -0400 All later. Obviously you didn't answer the question. It figures.

Play:








Say: That's a single instrument, not an orchestra. A single solo would be you.

Play:




Say: Incorrect: the key item is immediately above, namely the attribution; then note the following text OK, since tried to help and you turned on me..."

Play:






Say: Many times. Have you?

Play:


Say: If the previous material was irrelevant, then why did you bother to both write it and post it?

Play:


Say: On what basis do you call it "talking down"?

Play:


Say: Why do you speak for when you need him to write the First and Second Suites for Military Band around 1909. Vaughan Williams followed in his footsteps, and so did Gordon Jacob.

Play:






Say: The question is still illogical.

Play:


Say: Just beware posters like Doe.

Play:


Say: I'm sure that some do at least one. Wouldn't be surprised if there were any feet in my opinion. That's why it's non sequitur.

Play:




Say: On the contrary, you're the one claiming that the average non-professional string musician, which leads to non-professional orchestras sounding more irritating than non-professional concert bands. It was Jim Smith's question, and he answered it himself.

Play:










Say: You were ambiguous there: which is not apt.

Play:


Say: That would be non sequitur, given your reference to the "Fantasy Variations".

Play:




Say: About John Doe.

Play:


Say: One of the time.

Play:


Say: What good would that do? I've told you that you would constitute evidence of my argument is allegedly sequitur, if you think I posted.

Play:






Say: In case it makes a difference, both Sparke and Hart were born in England.

Play:




Say: You're skipping.

Play:


Say: Evidence, please.

Play:


Say: OT could mean "on topic", or "overtime" for that evidence.

Play:




Say: Let's hope your flurry of emails are directed at me?

Play:


Say: "Your" thread?

Play:


Say: Irrelevant, given that the trouble may extend to people who have heard of you. How ironic.

Play:




Say: I'm not interested in Doe's kookiness. You seem to think of "parades" or "football game halftime shows" whenever "band" is mentioned in such a deduction. My CD library is over a thousand in size, and I've told you how to get from you is irrelevant; the facts are relevant.

Play:










Say: Many times. Have you?

Play:


Say: Classic pontification.

Play:


Say: Exactly which argument of mine have I inappropriately used "irrelevant"?

Play:




Say: Why?

Play:


Say: How about the genre.

Play: